Cheap Travel Insurance For People With Chickenpox

WWW.TRAVELINSURANCECHICKENPOX.CO.UK

With chickenpox you really should take travel insurance out when you go on holiday or travel abroad just in case you fall ill and need medical treatment as the NHS will not provide treatment whilst you are on holiday. The cost of receiving medical treatment outside the UK can be very expensive and the travel insurance will repay most of these costs provided you took it out before you left for your holiday.

In addition if you need assistance to get home, like an ambulance or medical staff to accompany you, then the travel insurance will pay for the costs associated with repatriation too.

For those with pre-existing medical conditions travel insurance can be expensive unless you shop around (this link might help you find cheap travel insurance for people with chickenpox).

Travellers with chickenpox have in the past paid significantly more for their travel insurance as those with chickenpox, like many other sufferers of a pre-existing condition have had their premiums raised. The travel insurance companies consider those that are under the treatment of a doctor, even on a routine basis, may be more likely to claim and hence cause them to have to pay out.

Additional rating factors which effect travel insurance are high blood pressure, high cholesterol and whether you smoke.

Chickenpox and travel insurance

Chickenpox (or chicken pox) is a highly contagious disease caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). It usually starts with vesicular skin rash mainly on the body and head rather than at the periphery and becomes itchy, raw pockmarks, which mostly heal without scarring. On examination, the observer typically finds skin lesions at various stages of healing and also ulcers in the oral cavity and tonsil areas.

Chickenpox is an airborne disease which spreads easily through coughing or sneezing of ill individuals or through direct contact with secretions from the rash. A person with chickenpox is infectious one to two days before the rash appears. They remain contagious until all lesions have crusted over (this takes approximately six days). Immunocompromised patients are contagious during the entire period as new lesions keep appearing. Crusted lesions are not contagious.

All of these factors will be taken into account when you apply for travel insurance with chickenpox.

In addition, those that are waiting for a diagnosis or additional tests face the highest premiums as what insurers’ hate most of all is uncertainty, especially around the possible risk of falling ill abroad with a condition that isn’t yet well controlled.